Pregnancy care – You Became Mamay http://youbecamemamay.com/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 05:07:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://youbecamemamay.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Pregnancy care – You Became Mamay http://youbecamemamay.com/ 32 32 Oklahoma Watch: Audit calls into question state provider’s ‘seriously underperforming’ pregnancy care program | Government and politics https://youbecamemamay.com/oklahoma-watch-audit-calls-into-question-state-providers-seriously-underperforming-pregnancy-care-program-government-and-politics/ Fri, 27 May 2022 17:15:00 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/oklahoma-watch-audit-calls-into-question-state-providers-seriously-underperforming-pregnancy-care-program-government-and-politics/ As Republican lawmakers in Oklahoma pass the toughest anti-abortion laws in the nation, an internal Oklahoma State Health Department audit shows the agency has serious performance concerns a selected provider to reimburse care for pregnant women in crisis centers that advise against abortions. Despite concerns, the Ministry of Health recently renewed the contract with the […]]]>

As Republican lawmakers in Oklahoma pass the toughest anti-abortion laws in the nation, an internal Oklahoma State Health Department audit shows the agency has serious performance concerns a selected provider to reimburse care for pregnant women in crisis centers that advise against abortions.

Despite concerns, the Ministry of Health recently renewed the contract with the Oklahoma Pregnancy Care Network for another year. Officials said they issued multiple requests for proposals, but the network was the only entity to respond.

The proposed budget for the financial year 2023, which passed the legislature last week and is awaiting action from Governor Kevin Stitt, has earmarked $3 million for the program to help pregnancy centers in crisis. Stit signed Senate Bill 1043which included funding, Wednesday.

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The Internal Audit, which was limited in scope, said the Oklahoma Pregnancy Care Network “appears seriously underperforming and is not using funds for this contract in the manner identified in the contract or legislation that created this funding”. He said the contract called for 9,300 women to be assisted over the two-year contract period. Only 524 women had received assistance until December 2021.

“Although internal audit recognizes that this is an entirely new program for this sub-recipient, the level of performance to date is concerning as well as the limited number of women actually served,” said the audit, dated April 20.






Madeline Craig, executive director of the Oklahoma Pregnancy Care Network, said she was unaware of the audit until asked by Oklahoma Watch. She said the original contract had a “fatal flaw” which meant the group was unable to start recruiting suppliers until May 2021.

“Our first year has been dedicated to laying the foundation for what will be a great, long-standing program serving the women and mothers of Oklahoma,” Craig said in an email. “The program has now reached a tipping point. It now provides more than $80,000 a month to providers serving customers in more than 20 counties in Oklahoma and is growing exponentially.

Choose the birth certificate

The contract with Oklahoma Pregnancy Care Network was awarded under the Childbirth Choice Act, a law passed in 2017 under former Governor Mary Fallin. It reimburses private organizations – including many religious organizations – for expenses used to provide information, referrals and assistance to women in carrying their unborn children to term. Money is not allowed to go to organizations that provide abortion services.

These crisis pregnancy centers can provide ultrasounds, prenatal care, test for sexually transmitted diseases, offer infant supplies, and advise pregnant women not to abort. More than 1.85 million people received services from 2,700 centers across the country in 2019, according to a Lozier Institute report. Many are run by affiliated churches, but few are licensed medical clinics.

The Legislature provided $2 million in funds for Oklahoma’s program for the first time in 2019. Three years later, Majority Leader Jon Echols said his main concern was getting the money to people who needed it.

“Whether we need to make a change or not, and it looks like we are, that hasn’t shaken my faith in the idea,” Echols said Tuesday. “We must always provide support for people who choose.

“We can fight on the issue of abortion all we want, but I still think we can stick together no matter where you are on the issue and be in favor of funding women who have need help if they choose to have their child.”

Auction Details

The Oklahoma Pregnancy Care Network Inc. was established in May 2019 and received its nonprofit association Internal Revenue Service designation in April 2020. Her response to the Department of Health’s offer includes at least 10 potential crisis pregnancy centers across the state.

“In sum, the OPCN network will provide meaningful reach of the program in all regions of the state so that services are accessible,” the organization said in its initial offer.

The bid response details the network’s plan to deal with unexpected pregnancies.

“Just as no one should make life-changing decisions under duress, no woman should feel pressured to terminate a pregnancy because she is afraid, alone, under pressure, or with no other options,” the nomination said. . “The program seeks to serve as a refuge for these women.”

During the first two years of the $2 million contract, the program paid out $392,000. Nearly $287,000 of that amount went to the Oklahoma Pregnancy Care Network. Only $106,000 was used to reimburse pregnancy centers in crisis, according to Department of Health financial records.

The organization’s initial bidding documents mention ties to John McNamara, the executive director of the Texas Pregnancy Care Network. Texas recently invested over $100 million in its Alternatives to abortion program, which began in 2005. After critics complained about liability, Texas lawmakers demanded more disclosure of results and non-profit contractors. The Texas Pregnancy Care Network was the sole contractor for this program until 2018.

In Oklahoma, the Department of Health’s internal audit raised questions about the Oklahoma Pregnancy Care Network spending $3,100 on travel and office supplies that weren’t covered by contract. He said little guidance was provided to the supplier and that previous Ministry of Health staff had approved the expenditure in an email.

In its latest response to the RFP, the Oklahoma Pregnancy Care Network said nine locations have since been onboarded after a slow start due to what it called “onerous insurance requirements” that the previous contract had for subcontractors.

“OPCN is currently in the midst of ongoing conversations with at least 25 new vendor sites interested in joining the program,” the response to the December application said.

Craig, the network’s executive director, said Wednesday that it now has 12 locations and aims to have at least 20 by the end of the year.

“These locations include more than just pregnancy centers,” Craig said. “They are also adoption agencies, social service agencies and residences for mothers. We serve clients throughout their pregnancy and for 12 months after the birth of their child.

In a statement, the Department of Health said it remained “committed to getting the money out to reimburse key providers through the Choice of Childbirth Act”.

“These organizations play a vital role in providing essential services to pregnant women across the state in counseling, education, referral and material assistance,” the agency said. “The OSDH will continue to ensure that reimbursement expenses are made in an urgent and timely manner. We will continue to work diligently with our contracted vendor to achieve our ultimate goal of serving Oklahomans.

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Medicaid pregnancy care varies widely by state https://youbecamemamay.com/medicaid-pregnancy-care-varies-widely-by-state/ Wed, 25 May 2022 19:46:23 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/medicaid-pregnancy-care-varies-widely-by-state/ Pregnancy-related healthcare services provided under Medicaid vary widely by state, according to a new survey. The differences are very significant because Medicaid funds more than 40% of births in the United States – more in some states – and two-thirds of births among blacks and Alaska Natives. In recent years, policymakers have paid increasing attention […]]]>

Pregnancy-related healthcare services provided under Medicaid vary widely by state, according to a new survey.

The differences are very significant because Medicaid funds more than 40% of births in the United States – more in some states – and two-thirds of births among blacks and Alaska Natives. In recent years, policymakers have paid increasing attention to the higher rates of maternal mortality among these groups.

The Kaiser Family Foundation this month released the results of a survey of 41 states between June and October 2021 which shows which pregnancy-related services each state covers. The federal government requires all states to provide free Medicaid coverage to pregnant women whose income is below 138% of the federal poverty level and for at least 60 days after giving birth. States are free to expand the benefits.

The federal government pays at least 50% Medicaid costs, and more in states with lower per capita income.

The report found that of the 41 states that responded, 31 cover pregnancy-related home blood pressure monitors, but only nine states reimburse for scales to monitor weight gain during pregnancy. Most states cover continuous blood glucose monitors and nutrition counseling for people with gestational diabetes.

More than half of responding states cover home births under Medicaid, though several require additional approvals or the presence of a doctor or midwife at the birth.

Less than half of the responding states offer courses on childbirth and parenting.

The survey found that most states cover home visitation services during and after pregnancy, although some of them limit such home visits for high-risk pregnancies.

Most states cover dental services for pregnant women enrolled in Medicaid, although some limit this benefit to emergency dental services and do not cover preventive dental care.

Three of the responding states — Indiana, New Jersey and Oregon — covered doula services as of July 1, 2021, and the report says Minnesota, which did not respond to the survey, does as well. Some other states have indicated they are considering adding doula services as a Medicaid benefit.

Most states cover treatment services for pregnant and postpartum women with substance use disorders beyond the minimum federal requirements.

However, the survey found that most state Medicaid agencies do not cover fertility assistance services. Eleven states cover diagnostic testing related to fertility. States are required to cover most prescription drugs under Medicaid, but not necessarily fertility drugs. California, Illinois, New York and Wisconsin are the only states among those who responded that cover fertility drugs.

About one-third of Medicaid programs in the state cover the full spectrum of breastfeeding services and supports, including classes, pumps and breastfeeding counselling.

Most state Medicaid agencies, 35 of 41, place no limit on the number of postpartum visits they cover.

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Pregnancy care centers protect babies and their mothers https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-centers-protect-babies-and-their-mothers/ Wed, 25 May 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-centers-protect-babies-and-their-mothers/ Thanks to advances in medicine and technology, we know a lot more about fetal development than when Roe vs. Wade was decided in 1973. We are also much more aware of the vivid humanity of the unborn child. These changes are evident to me in my work as a radiologist in which some of my […]]]>

Thanks to advances in medicine and technology, we know a lot more about fetal development than when
Roe vs. Wade
was decided in 1973. We are also much more aware of the vivid humanity of the unborn child. These changes are evident to me in my work as a radiologist in which some of my patients are pregnant women and their children. For this reason, I joined two other female physicians in submitting a friend of the court brief in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organizationthe Supreme Court case that could soon overturn Roe’s unlimited right to abortion.

Something else has changed over the last half century, something I see in my volunteer work. The pro-life community has built, through hard work and sacrifice, a thriving national network of pregnancy care centers dedicated to helping at-risk mothers and their babies.

These pregnancy support centers exist to offer real alternatives to women who too often think that their only choice is abortion. Volunteers and supporters understand that it would be wrong to defend the lives of vulnerable unborn children from elective abortion while ignoring the real challenges facing their mothers and fathers. Pregnancy care centers are a rebuttal to the baseless accusation leveled at pro-lifers – that they only care that these babies aren’t destroyed, that they don’t care at all about the babies or their families once the child is born.

Day in and day out, the volunteers and staff at these centers address the barriers that every mother-to-be faces. The obstacles are often considerable: poverty, insufficient access to maternity care, precarious living and employment situations, lack of vocational training and relational skills. The people at these centers try to help the women who come to them overcome these obstacles, and they do so with great enthusiasm and more love.

In an abortion center, on the other hand, a pregnant woman is offered exactly one option: abortion. She is told that a simple and quick surgery or the ingestion of a few pills will put this little episode behind her as if it never happened. And if she can’t afford the high facility fees, maybe a fit can be found.

This is a far cry from the open question posed by the same woman in a pregnancy care center: How can we help you weather this storm? How can we help you achieve your goals?

For my part, I have read fetal ultrasounds for several centers in South Florida. We date pregnancies and detect signs of life in embryos. We show the mother, and often the father, the delicious humanity of the little one on the way, the endearing vivacity of a little boy or a little girl. We also help them connect to the reality of the situation – a reality far more important than the daunting obstacles around it. Pregnancy resource centers reject the pro-choice movement’s downplaying of the painful consequences of abortion. We know that any abortion has victims: the baby of course, but also the mother who very often would have liked to hug this child in her arms if the circumstances had been different. Volunteers at pregnancy care centers do everything they can to make her dream possible and avoid abortion victims.

The good news is that many states have quietly increased funding for these facilities. Their legislatures respond to the wishes of voters who want to provide compassionate alternatives to at-risk mothers. My compatriots in Florida, as well as our friends in Texas, Pennsylvania and elsewhere, do not want women to be leads abort. We reject the worldview of Planned Parenthood and others who talk about “choice” but only have one option on their menu. Does the choice really exist when the other alternatives are non-existent or impossible to achieve?

Since the Supreme Court ruled deer in 1973, abortion advocates attacked the pro-life community for failing to meet the needs of pregnant women and their babies. This is an unfair criticism given the explosion of pregnancy resource centers over the past five decades. But here’s what makes the baseless political accusation more infuriating: They continue to attack the quiet and beautiful work of pro-life America just when it might be most needed if, God willing, the Supreme Court canceled deer and returns abortion policy to the states.

Grazie Christie is a radiologist and senior researcher at the Catholic Association.

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5 Ways to Help Your Local Pregnancy Care Center https://youbecamemamay.com/5-ways-to-help-your-local-pregnancy-care-center/ Thu, 19 May 2022 16:45:13 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/5-ways-to-help-your-local-pregnancy-care-center/ Recently I wrote about the Supreme Court’s leaked draft opinion that seeks to overturn the horrible 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision that legalized abortion. Although this leaked document was only a draft and no official decision has yet been made public, the leak has (violently) ignited the abortion debate across the country – you probably […]]]>

Recently I wrote about the Supreme Court’s leaked draft opinion that seeks to overturn the horrible 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision that legalized abortion. Although this leaked document was only a draft and no official decision has yet been made public, the leak has (violently) ignited the abortion debate across the country – you probably didn’t. seen some of the intense emotions surrounding such an important topic in your social media feeds.

But, unfortunately, the rage felt by many who are pro-abortion (really, pro-child sacrifice, which is murder), was voiced by at least one person who burned down and vandalized the headquarters of a pro-life group in Wisconsin on Mother’s Day. Apparently the vandals threw a Molotov cocktail through a window, and when it failed to ignite, they started a fire and then spray painted, “If abortions aren’t safe, then neither are you” outside the building. (Of course, the irony is that no abortion is safe – in a “successful” abortion, at least one person always dies!).

It is a wonderful time for believers to support these ministries and help prepare them to help even more women if Roe vs. Wade is indeed reversed.

While thankfully most pro-life centers and pregnancy care centers are not vandalized, these groups are doing compassionate and lifesaving work at a time when their adversaries are vocally slandering them and tensions are running high. It is a wonderful time for believers to support these ministries and help prepare them to help even more women if Roe vs. Wade is indeed reversed. Here are five practical ways1 to help your local centre:

  1. Volunteer. It may seem obvious, but consider this: Pregnancy care centers need volunteers to run their day-to-day operations: answering the phone, counseling mothers and fathers, offering post-abortion care, and gospel hope. , perform pregnancy tests, ultrasounds, STD tests, and more. But a volunteer who can offer a pregnant couple a free maternity photoshoot, a free prenatal massage, translation services or even a haircut or manicure could be a huge boon to the center, helping them to make sure that moms and dads feel valued.

  2. To give. Again, a no-brainer, but ministry costs money, and God uses his people to do his work, often through their generous financial gifts. But there are other ways to give than just donating to the main ministry. Host a baby shower to make a mother who may not have the means or support to host a baby shower feel special. Host a diaper or formula drive to provide essential baby items to families in need. Get creative with your family (what a great way to help kids see the value in life!) about how you can give.

  3. Fill their closets. Check with your local center to see if they accept donations of gently used maternity and baby items. Then donate what you may have that you no longer need and ask friends and family to join you.

  4. Talk to your church. Involve your church family in supporting a local center. Consider seeing if your church could “adopt a mom” and buy everything she needs — from a car seat to a crib to diapers — to care for her baby. A great way to do this is to ask the mother or care center to create an Amazon Baby Registry of the items she needs. Then ask church members to purchase items from this register, which are then shipped directly to the center to be given to the mother.

  5. Pray. What we see playing out in the culture right now regarding this issue is ugly – and it is part of a spiritual war. We must pray that moms and dads choose life and that pregnancy care centers continue to operate safely with compassion, help, and gospel-centered hope.

We praise the Lord for the many committed people who give their time, resources and energy to save babies for the glory of God. It is vital work in a dark time.

Speak for those who cannot speak for themselves, for the rights of all those in need. (Proverbs 31:8)

Gear up!

And equip yourself to defend the sanctity of human life by visiting our powerful “Fearfully and Wonderfully Made” exhibit at Creation Museum (with a new, larger exhibit coming soon!) or using the many resources we’ve produced to equip believers to stand up and stand up for unborn and helpless children.

Get more answers on News Answers

This point was discussed yesterday on News Answers with co-hosts Bryan Osborne, Roger Patterson and Dr. Kaia Kloster. News Answers is our bi-weekly news program filmed live in front of a studio audience and broadcast on my facebook page and the Answers on the Genesis Facebook page. We also covered the following topics:

  • Should Christians Repent of “Anti-Judaism”?
  • Does evolution appreciate beauty?
  • Is a supermassive black hole precursor a “missing link”?
  • And more!

Watch the full episode of News Answers for May 18, 2022.

Be sure to join us every Monday and Wednesday at 2 p.m. ET on my Facebook page or the Answers in Genesis Facebook page for News Answers. You won’t want to miss this unique news program that delivers scientific and cultural news in a distinctly biblical and Christian perspective.

Thank you for stopping by and thank you for praying,
Ken

This article was written with the help of the AiG research team.

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Pregnancy Care Products Market, Growth, Share, Size, Segmentations, Industry Trends, Demand and Forecast 2022 to 2028 https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-products-market-growth-share-size-segmentations-industry-trends-demand-and-forecast-2022-to-2028/ Thu, 19 May 2022 04:35:29 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-products-market-growth-share-size-segmentations-industry-trends-demand-and-forecast-2022-to-2028/ Summary A new market study titled “Upcoming Trends, Growth Drivers and Challenges in Pregnancy Care Products Market” has been featured on fusionmarketresearch. This report provides an in-depth study of ‘Pregnancy Care Products Market’using SWOT analysis i.e. strength, weakness, opportunity and threat to the organization. pregnancy care products market The report also provides an in-depth survey […]]]>

Summary

A new market study titled “Upcoming Trends, Growth Drivers and Challenges in Pregnancy Care Products Market” has been featured on fusionmarketresearch.

This report provides an in-depth study of ‘Pregnancy Care Products Market’using SWOT analysis i.e. strength, weakness, opportunity and threat to the organization. pregnancy care products market The report also provides an in-depth survey of the major market players based on the various objectives of an organization such as profiling, product outline, production quantity, required raw material, and production. The financial health of the organization.

Request a free sample report @ https://www.fusionmarketresearch.com/sample_request/(COVID-Version)-Global-Pregnancy-Care-Product-Market-2022/99257

The report offers detailed coverage of the Pregnancy Care Products industry and key market trends with the impact of Coronavirus. The market study includes historical and forecast market data, demand, application details, price trends and company shares of the leading pregnancy care product by geography. The report splits the market size, by volume and value, on the basis of application type and geography.

First, this report covers the current status and future outlook of the global Pregnancy Care Products market for 2016-2025.

And in this report, we analyze the global market from 5 geographies: Asia-Pacific[China, Southeast Asia, India, Japan, Korea, Western Asia]Europe[Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia, Spain, Netherlands, Turkey, Switzerland]North America[United States, Canada, Mexico]Middle East and Africa[GCC, North Africa, South Africa]South America[Brazil, Argentina, Columbia, Chile, Peru].

At the same time, we classify pregnancy care products according to type, application by geography. More importantly, the report includes major countries market based on type and application.
Finally, the report provides detailed profile and data information analysis of leading Pregnancy Care Products company.

Key Players of Pregnancy Care Product including:
ET Browne Medicine
Mama Mio United States
Noodle & Boo Maternity Novena
Expanscience Laboratories
ET Browne Medicine
Clarins Group

The Pregnancy Care Products Market split by Type can be split into:
Stretch mark minimizer
breast cream
Toning/firming lotion
Itch prevention cream
Nipple protection cream
Others

The Pregnancy Care Products Market split by Application can be split into:
In line
Offline

Market segment by region/country comprising:
North America (United States, Canada and Mexico)
Europe (Germany, UK, France, Italy, Russia and Spain etc.)
Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Australia and Southeast Asia, etc.)
South America (Brazil, Argentina and Colombia etc.)
Middle East and Africa (South Africa, UAE and Saudi Arabia etc.)

To ask questions @ https://www.fusionmarketresearch.com/enquiry.php/(COVID-Version)-Global-Pregnancy-Care-Product-Market-2022/99257

Contents

Part 1 Market Overview
1.1 Market definition
1.2 Market development
1.2.1 Current situation
1.2.2 Aspects of the impact of COVID-19
1.3 By type
Table Type of pregnancy care product
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Type in 2020
1.4 By Application
Pregnancy Care Product Application Table
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Application in 2020
1.5 By region
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Region in 2020
Figure Asia Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Region in 2020

Part 2 Key Companies
2.1 Drug AND Browne
2.1.1 Company profile
Table ET Browne Medication Overview List
2.1.2 Presentation of products and services
2.1.3 List of sales data
Table ET Browne Drug Pregnancy Care Products Business Operation (Sales Revenue, Sales Volume, Price, Cost, Gross Margin)
2.2 Mama Mio United States
2.3 Noodle & Boo Maternity Novena
2.4 Expanscience Laboratories
2.5 HE Browne Drug
2.6 Clarins Group

Part 3 Global Market Status and Future Forecast
3.1 Global Market by Region
Table Global Pregnancy Care Products Market by Region, 2016-2020 (Million USD)
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Region in 2020 (Million USD)
Table Global Pregnancy Care Products Market by Region, 2016-2020 (Volume)
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Region in 2020 (Volume)
Price table by region, 2016-2020
3.2 Global Market by Company
Table Global Pregnancy Care Products Market by Company, 2016-2020 (Million USD)
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Company in 2020 (Million USD)
Table Global Pregnancy Care Products Market by Company, 2016-2020 (Volume)
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Company in 2020 (Volume)
Tariff table by company, 2016-2020
3.3 Global Market by Type
Table Global Pregnancy Care Products Market by Type, 2016-2020 (Million USD)
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Type in 2020 (Million USD)
Table Global Pregnancy Care Products Market by Type, 2016-2020 (Volume)
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Type in 2020 (Volume)
Price table by type, 2016-2020
3.4 Global Market by Application
Table Global Pregnancy Care Products Market by Application, 2016-2020 (Million USD)
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Application in 2020 (Million USD)
Table Global Pregnancy Care Products Market by Application, 2016-2020 (Volume)
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Share by Application in 2020 (Volume)
Pricing Table by Application, 2016-2020
3.5 Global Market by Forecast
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Forecast, 2021E-2026F (Million USD)
Figure Global Pregnancy Care Products Market Forecast, 2021E-2026F (Volume)

Carry on…

ABOUT US:

Fusion Market Research is one of the largest collections of market research reports from many publishers. We have a team of industry specialists providing unbiased reporting information to best meet the requirements of our clients. We offer a comprehensive collection of competitive market research reports from a number of global leaders across all industry segments.

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COMTEX_407432520/2800/2022-05-19T00:33:13

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Immigrant women face language and cultural barriers to pregnancy care https://youbecamemamay.com/immigrant-women-face-language-and-cultural-barriers-to-pregnancy-care/ Tue, 17 May 2022 01:34:59 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/immigrant-women-face-language-and-cultural-barriers-to-pregnancy-care/ https://illinoisnewsroom.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/NEWS20220511_LanguagePregnancy_FeatureFINAL.mp3 This article is the first in a series on access to pregnancy care for immigrants in Champaign. You can read part two here and part three here. “Why do you have more children?” » It’s a question a Champaign doctor asked Faviola Silva during a doctor’s appointment. “He started asking me a lot of […]]]>

This article is the first in a series on access to pregnancy care for immigrants in Champaign. You can read part two here and part three here.

“Why do you have more children?” »

It’s a question a Champaign doctor asked Faviola Silva during a doctor’s appointment.

“He started asking me a lot of questions that weren’t even relevant,” Silva said in Spanish. “Instead of helping me, he was sort of scolding me.”

Silva is one of 10 Champaign County residents who are immigrants, as well as one of more than 4,000 Spanish speakers in the county.

Her story is similar to that told by many immigrant women both in Champaign and across the country who don’t speak English and have struggled to access pregnancy care.

Kimberly Fryer, OBGYN and assistant professor at the University of South Florida, said she noticed many barriers for immigrants and Spanish speakers to prenatal care, even beyond language.

Fryer led a study comprised of focus groups of Spanish-speaking women, which she said was intended to take a closer look at the specific barriers that Spanish-speaking women face when it comes to prenatal care.

“It was really to dig into what those specific issues were and really try to find out what, in a more systematic way, not just what I saw in the clinic, of what those issues actually were,” she mentioned.

Fryer said that, among other barriers, the most significant specific to Latina women were language, prejudice, racism and undocumented status.

Many women in Champaign cited language and bias as some of the biggest and most frustrating barriers.

Although many hospitals and clinics in Champaign have bias training, Fryer said it’s not always easy to get rid of bias.

“It could be things that are very implicit and that you wouldn’t necessarily think of as bias but become bias,” she said. “It becomes a bit systematic because all of a sudden you’re treated differently just because you don’t speak English.”

For example, in the case of Silva and many other women, the judgment on the number of children she wanted to have could be considered biased.

But, Silva said, above all, language has been the biggest hurdle for her to overcome.

Silva is originally from Tamaulipas, Mexico. She came to Champaign from Texas, where she said it was easy to find people who spoke Spanish.

In Champaign, she said, that was not the case.

“The language bothered me a lot because in Texas most people speak Spanish,” she said. “It was very, very difficult because I couldn’t speak English.”

Silva arrived in Champaign four months pregnant and she said she didn’t even know how to order food in English – just hot dogs.

So when she went for prenatal care, she said, she had a lot of problems.

She said she ended up finding a place to go because her husband asked a friend of his whose wife was pregnant for recommendations.

Silva was referred to a Women, Infants and Children (WIC) program, which prepared an insurance card for her and sent her for a doctor.

Silva’s husband had helped her through this since he knew a little English, she said, but in the end he got too busy with work.

“He didn’t have time to go around to help me, ie take me to the doctor etc. “, she says. “I didn’t even know where to look.”

And although Silva found a clinic, a clinic she says often helps immigrants, the care she received wasn’t exactly the best, she said.

“I had several bad experiences,” she said. “I don’t know if it’s because they have a lot of (patients) or because they’re busy or people are already very tired – the doctors. I do not know.”

Doctors, she says, don’t always take the time to understand other people and their cultures, so they’re not knowledgeable about immigrants and their experiences.

“They don’t take the time to pay attention to it, you know?” Silva said. “There are a lot of people who lack information and even more when someone comes from Mexico, for that matter, because of culture or ignorance or I don’t know.”

To avoid judgment and even more bad experiences, Silva said whenever she had doubts, she kept quiet.

And that’s something health care workers said they were aware of.

Ashley Munoz, breastfeeding counselor and translator at CUPHD, said the judgment patients may feel often stems directly from a language barrier, making it harder for patients and doctors to communicate both words and attitudes.

“Sometimes they feel like we’re judging them if they do something wrong or if they don’t do anything,” Munoz said. “If you make them feel like they can’t trust you or that you’re judging them, they’ll stop talking to you.”

She said healthcare providers need to be thorough and clear when communicating with patients, as well as inquiring about the backgrounds of their patients and clients.

“The most important thing is clear communication with this population and building trust with these people and learning from them, their backgrounds, their stories,” she said. “That’s how you know how to help them and know what they need.”

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Pregnancy care clinic opens at Cranbrook Urgent and Primary Care Center – Cranbrook Daily Townsman https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-clinic-opens-at-cranbrook-urgent-and-primary-care-center-cranbrook-daily-townsman/ Thu, 12 May 2022 15:15:00 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-clinic-opens-at-cranbrook-urgent-and-primary-care-center-cranbrook-daily-townsman/ Comprehensive pregnancy care services and supports are now available through the Encompass Pregnancy Care Clinic at the Urgent and Primary Care Center in Cranbrook. The new clinic, which opened in March, is supported by eight Cranbrook-based maternity doctors and staffed by a nurse experienced in pregnancy care. Encompass Pregnancy Care was created to be a […]]]>

Comprehensive pregnancy care services and supports are now available through the Encompass Pregnancy Care Clinic at the Urgent and Primary Care Center in Cranbrook.

The new clinic, which opened in March, is supported by eight Cranbrook-based maternity doctors and staffed by a nurse experienced in pregnancy care.

Encompass Pregnancy Care was created to be a non-judgmental, inclusive and culturally safe space where all patients feel heard, comfortable and supported, according to Interior Health.

“We are a group of local physicians working together to provide comprehensive, high-quality, standardized medical care and support for pregnant patients,” said Dr. Madeline Oosthuizen, family physician and Encompass Clinic physician.

“Parents will have the opportunity to get to know each member of our team of doctors, will meet directly at each visit with our maternity nurse at the clinic, who is a wealth of information, and will be connected to other resources. community and health services specific to pre and postnatal care.

The Encompass Pregnancy Clinic is part of the East Kootenay Primary Care Network, a network of team-based care providers in the region. Patients attending the clinic may have one-stop access to a number of care options, including mental wellness clinicians, physiotherapists, social workers and more.

Encompass pregnancy care services include:

• Pre and postnatal care

• Labor and delivery at East Kootenay Regional Hospital

• Support and management of early pregnancy loss

• Preconception advice

• Birth control options

• Family planning

• Lactation support

Encompass Pregnancy Care Clinic is accepting new patients from Cranbrook and surrounding communities. If anyone wants pregnancy care, call the Urgent and Primary Care Center to schedule an appointment at (250) 420-2323.

The Cranbrook Urgent and Primary Care Center – located at the Baker Street Professional Center at 1311 2nd St. – opened its doors last December, through a partnership between the Department of Health, Homeland Health, the Division of East Kootenay Family Medicine, the Ktunaxa Nation and the Kootenay District Council of the Eastern Regional Hospital.

UPCC supports patients with non-life-threatening conditions who need to see a medical professional, but do not need to go to the emergency room.

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Pregnancy Care Clinic opens at Cranbrook Urgent and Primary Care Center – Kimberley Daily Bulletin https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-clinic-opens-at-cranbrook-urgent-and-primary-care-center-kimberley-daily-bulletin/ Thu, 12 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-clinic-opens-at-cranbrook-urgent-and-primary-care-center-kimberley-daily-bulletin/ Comprehensive pregnancy care services and supports are now available through the Encompass Pregnancy Care Clinic at the Urgent and Primary Care Center in Cranbrook. The new clinic, which opened in March, is supported by eight Cranbrook-based maternity doctors and staffed by a nurse experienced in pregnancy care. Encompass Pregnancy Care was created to be a […]]]>

Comprehensive pregnancy care services and supports are now available through the Encompass Pregnancy Care Clinic at the Urgent and Primary Care Center in Cranbrook.

The new clinic, which opened in March, is supported by eight Cranbrook-based maternity doctors and staffed by a nurse experienced in pregnancy care.

Encompass Pregnancy Care was created to be a non-judgmental, inclusive and culturally safe space where all patients feel heard, comfortable and supported, according to Interior Health.

“We are a group of local physicians working together to provide comprehensive, high-quality, standardized medical care and support for pregnant patients,” said Dr. Madeline Oosthuizen, family physician and Encompass Clinic physician.

“Parents will have the opportunity to get to know each member of our team of doctors, will meet directly at each visit with our maternity nurse at the clinic, who is a wealth of information, and will be connected to other resources. community and health services specific to pre and postnatal care.

The Encompass Pregnancy Clinic is part of the East Kootenay Primary Care Network, a network of team-based care providers in the region. Patients attending the clinic may have one-stop access to a number of care options, including mental wellness clinicians, physiotherapists, social workers and more.

Encompass pregnancy care services include:

• Pre and postnatal care

• Labor and delivery at East Kootenay Regional Hospital

• Support and management of early pregnancy loss

• Preconception advice

• Birth control options

• Family planning

• Lactation support

Encompass Pregnancy Care Clinic is accepting new patients from Cranbrook and surrounding communities. If anyone wants pregnancy care, call the Urgent and Primary Care Center to schedule an appointment at (250) 420-2323.

The Cranbrook Urgent and Primary Care Center – located at the Baker Street Professional Center at 1311 2nd St. – opened its doors last December, through a partnership between the Department of Health, Homeland Health, the Division of East Kootenay Family Medicine, the Ktunaxa Nation and the Kootenay District Council of the Eastern Regional Hospital.

UPCC supports patients with non-life-threatening conditions who need to see a medical professional, but do not need to go to the emergency room.

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Opening of a pregnancy care center in Cranbrook https://youbecamemamay.com/opening-of-a-pregnancy-care-center-in-cranbrook/ Thu, 12 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/opening-of-a-pregnancy-care-center-in-cranbrook/ Expectant parents can enjoy greater access to comprehensive care through the new Encompass Pregnancy Care Clinic in Cranbrook. Interior Health officials said it opened at the Cranbrook Urgent and Primary Care Center. The clinic is supported by eight maternity doctors and a number of nurses experienced in pregnancy care. “We are a group of local […]]]>

Expectant parents can enjoy greater access to comprehensive care through the new Encompass Pregnancy Care Clinic in Cranbrook.

Interior Health officials said it opened at the Cranbrook Urgent and Primary Care Center.

The clinic is supported by eight maternity doctors and a number of nurses experienced in pregnancy care.

“We are a group of local physicians working together to provide comprehensive, high-quality, standardized medical and supportive care for pregnant patients,” said Dr. Madeline Oosthuizen, Family Physician (FP) and Encompass Clinic physician. “Parents will have the opportunity to get to know each member of our team of doctors, will meet directly at each visit with our maternity nurse at the clinic, who is a wealth of information, and will be connected to other resources. community and health services specific to pre and postnatal care.

Services offered include the following:

    • Pre and postnatal care
    • Labor and Delivery at the East Kootenay Regional Hospital
    • Accompaniment and management of miscarriages in early pregnancy
    • Preconception consultation
    • Contraceptive options
    • Family planning
    • lactation support

“We are delighted to welcome Encompass Pregnancy Care to our urgent care team. The Primary Care Network partnership between Interior Health, the Ktunaxa Nation and the East Kootenay Division of Family Medicine has expanded services to people in Cranbrook and Kimberley,” said Shannon Statham, Primary Care Manager. of Interior Health for East Kootenay. “With team-based care, patients can see the most appropriate healthcare professional to treat their needs. We are proud to welcome new parents to the centre.

New patients from Cranbrook and surrounding communities are being accepted at the Encompass Pregnancy Care Clinic.

You can call the Urgent and Primary Care Center at (250) 420-2323 to schedule an appointment.

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Pregnancy care centers on alert over attacks, vandalism • Bible Recorder https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-centers-on-alert-over-attacks-vandalism-bible-recorder/ Tue, 10 May 2022 17:08:58 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/pregnancy-care-centers-on-alert-over-attacks-vandalism-bible-recorder/ Wisconsin Family Action Facebook Photo Tensions heightened following leaked Supreme Court document indicating possible reversal of court’s 1973 ruling Roe vs. Wade The ruling preceded attacks across the country on pro-life churches and pregnancy care centers, leaving like-minded groups on high alert while maintaining their positions on the sanctity of life. “Our Mission Hasn’t Changed,” […]]]>
Wisconsin Family Action Facebook Photo

Tensions heightened following leaked Supreme Court document indicating possible reversal of court’s 1973 ruling Roe vs. Wade The ruling preceded attacks across the country on pro-life churches and pregnancy care centers, leaving like-minded groups on high alert while maintaining their positions on the sanctity of life.

“Our Mission Hasn’t Changed,” Care Net-Madison (Wis.) CEO Sara Patterson Baptist Press (BP) said on May 5, three days before Wisconsin Family Action (WFA) headquarters were set on fire in an attack that included the attempted use of a Molotov cocktail. In addition to the fire, messages scrawled on his building included: “If abortions aren’t safe, then neither are you.

Patterson’s comments came in response to a question about pro-abortion protests in response to the leaked SCOTUS document. Now they also deal with acts of violence, as the WFA offices are a mile from those of Care Net.

The proximity prompted Care Net, where several Southern Baptists volunteer, to ask for more security.

“We are doing well so far, but are asking the police to patrol more,” Patterson told BP in an email May 8. “Please Pray!”

In Fort Collins, Colorado on May 7, a Catholic church suffered its second episode of vandalism in recent months in what authorities called “a bias-motivated crime.” Local television reports confirmed that the message “My body, my choice” had been painted on the front doors of the church. Windows were smashed and statues on the property were defaced.

That same day, the executive director of The Loreto House, a pregnancy resource center in Denton, Texas, arrived at work to find “Not a Clinic” on its main sign and front door and “The forced birth is murder” spray painted next to the front door.

The upcoming SCOTUS ruling, if indeed reflected in the leaked document, redirects abortion regulatory power to the states. Current legislation provides that 26 states, including Wisconsin, effectively ban abortion if it occurs. Illinois would be on a different side, literally surrounded by first-tier states.

“The impact is and will be significant for pro-life pregnancy clinics in Illinois as neighboring states ban abortion,” said Doug Devore, acting executive director of Illinois Baptist Children’s Homes and Family Services (BCHFS). “In the state of [Illinois], we have already started to see it through pro-abortion legislation (Reproductive Health Act 2019). Additionally, bills such as HB4221 are created to discredit Illinois pro-life pregnancy centers.

The BCHFS clinic in Camri opened in December 2020 and is in a rural upstate area, less than an hour from one of the largest abortion clinics in Illinois and less than 60 miles from three other states. The challenges come not only from fighting against the image of “women’s health” promoted by abortion clinics, but also from women who pursue medical abortions thanks to the morning after pill.

The BCHFS has been operational since 1979.

“We welcome the opportunity to share the services we provide through our ministry,” Devore said. “We not only care about the unborn child, but also about the mother and the whole family.

“We want to share the truth about the choices women and men face during an unexpected pregnancy. We offer pregnancy testing, sexually transmitted infection testing and treatment, labor and delivery classes, limited ultrasounds, parent training, and post-abortion support services.

Programs to support mothers and fathers beyond the birth of a child are a mainstay of these clinics. In addition to prenatal care and counseling, Care Net offers educational classes, a paternity program, and a maternity home where women can stay for free and pursue goals such as a college education.

“We want them to be the best mothers possible,” Patterson said. “We work with dads to help them learn how they can best support their partner. … Dad support is very important, and we have men working with them directly.

Devore told BP that BCHFS has not received any threats but will continue to follow security policies and procedures already in place. These include keeping doors locked and not seeing customers if only one member of staff is present, a security system with cameras and alarms, and reporting any threatening or suspicious behavior to local police.

“That would include protesters, threatening phone calls or any violence,” Devore said.

Daniel Degnerdirector of the Wisconsin Family Council’s Church Ambassador Network, thanked the state executive Leo Endel and the Minnesota-Wisconsin Baptist Convention for their support.

“The weekend’s headlines made it clear that many pro-life churches and ministries across the country, as well as conservative Supreme Court justices, have been targeted by pro-abortion activists,” Degner wrote in a May 9 email shared with BP. with his permission.

A fire that broke out in the office of WFC Executive Director Julaine Appling left damage from flames, smoke and water. Appling is set to appear on Tucker Carlson Tonight tonight, Denger added.

There are many ways Southern Baptists can pray for his group and others, Denger shared with Endel. The praise should include that no one in the office was injured, the fire was spotted and brought under control quickly, and the neighbors who shared their office building suffered no loss. Prayer requests include wisdom for personnel, success for law enforcement during the investigation, and for those who committed the crime to be brought to repentance and salvation. Provided in bold, the email read: “Pray that God is happy to take what was meant for evil and use it for good.”

(EDITOR’S NOTE – Scott Barkley is National Correspondent for Baptist Press.)

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