Motherhood stage – You Became Mamay http://youbecamemamay.com/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 21:08:43 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://youbecamemamay.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-120x120.jpg Motherhood stage – You Became Mamay http://youbecamemamay.com/ 32 32 Land grants to valley artists for their work https://youbecamemamay.com/land-grants-to-valley-artists-for-their-work/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 19:15:21 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/land-grants-to-valley-artists-for-their-work/ Four generations of Deerfield arborists have managed the land of Clarkdale Fruit Farms for more than a century, harvesting an ancient apple variety that measures just 1 inch in diameter, the most popular bite-sized Lady apple. among the youngest visitors to the farm. “Farmer momma” Lori Holmes Clark lives in Clarkdale, where she raises her […]]]>

Four generations of Deerfield arborists have managed the land of Clarkdale Fruit Farms for more than a century, harvesting an ancient apple variety that measures just 1 inch in diameter, the most popular bite-sized Lady apple. among the youngest visitors to the farm.

“Farmer momma” Lori Holmes Clark lives in Clarkdale, where she raises her children and works as a resident artist on the farm. In art and in motherhood, she conveys the understanding that “food does not come from the store, it comes from the ground”.

Clark is a New York native whose roots in Broadway performance art inspired an audio-visual installation at The Farm, an ongoing project which, among 19 other local art projects, recently won a $4,000 grant. from the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts through its Project Evolution grant. program.

Her installation, “Doorways – Mirth and Memory”, functions as both an immersive theatrical experience and an audio-guided tour of the farm, providing children with a fictional tale of apple-growing fairies and telling parents and other adults the stories. true and ruthless. of the old farmers of Clarkdale.

“Performance art is fleeting, it happens – and if it’s going to happen again, the agency responsible for producing it must make a deliberate effort,” Clark said Monday afternoon as he waited for the school bus to arrive from their children. “I have lupus and my body is changing and my stamina is changing, so I wanted to create something more sustainable.”

This is where Project Evolution comes in. The new program is an extension of the Community Foundation’s ValleyCreates working capital grant initiative, which since February 2020 has awarded four rounds of $1,000 microgrants to 85 artists. These small grants have provided much-needed financial relief throughout the pandemic to pay for things like studio space and supplies, says Molly Rideout, the Community Foundation’s assistant director of assets for artists.

These artists were then eligible to apply for Project Evolution, which aims to go further, allowing artists to be compensated for their time and labor and to offset expenses associated with creative production.

For Northampton creator Mark Guglielmo, the grant facilitates a long-awaited transition to mixed media, a “second act” in his career as a photo collage artist.

Her project pays homage to the Italian-American immigrant experience and envisions capturing through fine art and layered textiles a cultural marriage that gets “the short end of the stick on the big screen.”

“Italian-American representation is basically limited to ‘The Godfather,’ ‘Goodfellas,’ ‘The Sopranos,’ ‘The Jersey Shore.’ The truth of our experience is unseen, and that’s when a multicultural people come here and are forced and coerced into embracing whiteness,” Guglielmo said. “You accept the financial benefits of whiteness, but you lose your soul, you lose your language.”

He says the support through Project Evolution will be transformative.

“Everyone else is working and expecting to be paid,” he says. “Being able to get paid to examine history through art and just to create art is fundamental – you can’t do great work without financial support.”

Start of the Evolution project

Clark and Gugglielmo are two of 20 visual artists, musicians, poets and performers from Western Massachusetts to receive a total of $80,000 through Project Evolution. The program is supported in part by the Boston-based Barr Foundation’s Creative Commonwealth Program, a 10-year philanthropic partnership benefiting five regional foundations across the state.

Grantees also have access to a wealth of professional development resources made available through the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art’s Assets for Artists program.

Rideout says up to half of Project Evolution applicants identified structured projects as new to them and said they would appreciate guidance on the non-creative components of professional art production, such as marketing and copywriting. of grants.

Grant recipients can choose to attend workshops and coaching sessions of up to two hours in length until May 2023, when the grant expires. The one-year shelf life of the funding is designed to encourage the growth and completion of projects that began simply as submissions at the application stage.

Diana Alvarez, a Holyoke performer from Texas, has been working on her “chosen family” piece “Quiero Volver, A Xicanx Ritual Opera” for eight years — she’s staged it four times already, using only borrowed material.

The piece is participatory and relies on a field recorder, microphone and projector to present documentary portraits of BIPOC artists and to facilitate an open mic for BIPOC audience members during the performance.

“Quiero Volver” is neither like a traditional play nor a traditional opera, and like each of the other grant recipients’ plays, Alvarez’s performance centers the community by cultivating audience engagement.

“I always knew I wanted to be a musician, but it took me a long time to come to terms with that about myself. On stage, it’s important that I invite attendees to meditate and reflect,” Alvarez said. . “[The stage] is really a space for reflection where I try to push people not to do what I did.

“It’s an attempt to encourage people to be artists in a world that badly needs us,” she said.

Other artists who have won grants through the Evolution Project include: Faith Alkiewicz, Northampton; Maria Luisa Arroyo Cruzado, Springfield; Rachel Blackman, Northampton; Frankie Borrero, Springfield; Keshawn Dodds, Springfield; Michelle Falcon Fontánez, Indian Orchard; Magdalena Gomez, Springfield; Imo Imeh, Holyoke; Maria Kenison, Springfield; Robert Markey, Ashfield; Kurt Meyer, Shelburne Falls; Heshima Moja, Indian orchard; Ivonne Montoya, Northampton; Samuel Perry, Turners Falls; Rochelle Shicoff, Monson; Ja Ja Swinton, West Springfield; and Shandyce Willis, Springfield.

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Tina Knowles-Lawson talks fashion and family with Jalen Rose https://youbecamemamay.com/tina-knowles-lawson-talks-fashion-and-family-with-jalen-rose/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 04:01:00 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/tina-knowles-lawson-talks-fashion-and-family-with-jalen-rose/ She can thank lost baggage for her current design career. My “Renaissance Man” guest is Queen Tina Knowles-Lawson, also known as beyonce’s mother and Solange Knowles — though she’ll also claim Destiny’s Child member Kelly Rowland as part of her offspring. Miss Tina regularly styled the girl group, but on a trip to Jamaica for […]]]>

She can thank lost baggage for her current design career. My “Renaissance Man” guest is Queen Tina Knowles-Lawson, also known as beyonce’s mother and Solange Knowles — though she’ll also claim Destiny’s Child member Kelly Rowland as part of her offspring. Miss Tina regularly styled the girl group, but on a trip to Jamaica for an MTV event, the costumes and luggage were nowhere to be found.

“I had to go to the side of the road and I took all these camouflage clothes and cut them up and made costumes for the girls,” she told me. “They were with Wyclef Jean and he was like, ‘Wow, who did your hair today?’ And Beyoncé said, “My mom did.” He was like, ‘You should style them all the time.’ And that’s how I started styling them.

She said her new role was totally unexpected. Not that she can’t manage with a roll of fabric and a sewing machine. Growing up in Galveston, Texas, Mama Tina came from a large family with few means. Her mother and grandmother were seamstresses. His nephew was a designer.

“So I was surrounded by fashion and people who couldn’t take anything and do something with it. I grew up with the strength of my mother. [She] furniture reupholstered to make curtains, [and made] clothes for people. So it was just in my blood. And I always wanted to do something in fashion… I always did everyone’s hair, I did them makeup. I made all my friends’ prom dresses.

And get this: she was in a girl group, called the Veltones.

“We were really good, but we were more known for our costumes than our entertainment,” she said. “And my mom and I did all the costumes.”

In addition to sewing, her mother taught her to be charitable and selfless. Recently Miss Tina and I were in a HIV awareness campaign titled Me in You, You in Me.

“My mom was so humanitarian… Everything we had, she shared with everyone,” Mama Tina said of her own mother. “And she did what she could do with next to nothing. It was a great lesson. She always taught us that if you do things for someone, you do it from the heart, you don’t do it for recognition, because then you already have your blessing.

Mama Tina has carved out a big name for herself in fashion and design, and even dipped her toe into the acting world with Lifetime’s “Wrath: A Seven Deadly Sins Story,” which premiered in April. Funny enough, she played the mother of Destiny’s Child member Michelle Williams.

Tina Knowles-Lawson says all her kids wanted to do growing up was play.
Tina Knowles-Lawson says all her kids wanted to do growing up was play.
Getty Images

Through it all, however, she said she my favorite job is being a grandmother. But she raised two superstars, one of whom is arguably the greatest artist of all time. Did she see their unique talents as children? Tina said no. They just loved to play.

“I mean, nobody wanted to come to our house because [Beyoncé and Solange] sold them tickets and had them watch shows. [The girls] always loved [performing]. They didn’t want to play outside. That’s all they wanted to do.

Mama Tina put them both in dance class — surprisingly, as she hoped it would help Beyoncé come out of her shell. “She was super shy and I thought she would make friends. Her dance teacher was actually the stage mom. She was like, ‘This little girl is so talented.’ And I’m like, ‘Yeah, everyone thinks their kid’s got talent.’ It took me a while to really be a believer, you know, because…I never wanted to be that parent.She added that her ex-husband, Mathew Knowles, asked their daughters to study the greats like Motown icons Diana Ross and the Supremes, Martha and the Vandellas and Smokey Robinson, the Knowles sisters actively tried to emulate them.

“They had such great role models. They looked [footage] and they knew these artists and the Motown era. The girls were very, very dedicated to their craft.

Tina has accomplished so much on her own, but she’s also become a revered mother in pop culture. We all feel a bit of her motherly magic. In December, she even launched a Facebook show, “Talk with Mama Tina.” And we know mothers aren’t supposed to have favorites, but I wanted to know her favorite songs from her each of her daughters.

For Solange, Mama Tina did not hesitate to say “Cranes in the Sky”.

As for Beyoncé?

“I’ve had so many with her, but probably ‘Survivor.’ It’s Destiny’s Child. This song means so much to me because I’ve seen it give people the courage to do things.

Detroit native Jalen Rose is a member of the University of Michigan iconoclast Fab Five, which rocked college basketball in the early ’90s. He played 13 seasons in the NBA, before becoming a media personality. Rose is currently an analyst for “NBA Countdown” and “Get Up,” and co-host of “Jalen & Jacoby.” He produced “The Fab Five” for ESPN’s “30 for 30” series, is the bestselling author of “Got To Give the People What They Want,” a fashion designer, and co-founded the Jalen Rose Leadership. Academy, a public charter school in his hometown.

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Hadlock Field now has a private area for nursing moms https://youbecamemamay.com/hadlock-field-now-has-a-private-area-for-nursing-moms/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 20:34:42 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/hadlock-field-now-has-a-private-area-for-nursing-moms/ Hadlock Field, home of the Portland Sea Dogs in Portland, Maine, just made history. They are the very first professional sports venue in the state to have a private area just for nursing mothers. Sea Wolves Logo, MiLBSea Wolves Logo, MiLB This is an incredibly accommodating move that really should be the norm and not […]]]>

Hadlock Field, home of the Portland Sea Dogs in Portland, Maine, just made history. They are the very first professional sports venue in the state to have a private area just for nursing mothers.

Sea Wolves Logo, MiLB

Sea Wolves Logo, MiLB

This is an incredibly accommodating move that really should be the norm and not the exception in family public places.

It should be noted, however, that it is not illegal for a mother to breastfeed her baby in public. Whether it’s at the mall, at the restaurant or at a Sea Dogs game. This addition is simply for those who wish to feed their baby privately and not have to use the toilet.

Attend a Sea Dogs game

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Think about it, would you like to eat your hot dogs from the park and your beer in the bathroom? I do not think so.

The right is as follows;

§4634. Right to breastfeed
Notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, a person may breastfeed their baby in any place, public or private, where they are otherwise permitted to be.

Thank you Portland Sea Dogs for this amazing addition to the Tuff Shed nursing shed. And no worries, the shed will adapt to changing Maine weather with a heater and air conditioner.

The next time you go to a game with your little one, ask an usher to tell you about the new breastfeeding space. Be sure to tell your friends and family about it so they have one less thing to worry about when they venture outside for summer fun with the little ones!

Want to go to a game? Check the Portland Sea Dogs Schedule here.

12 Activities in Maine Your Kids Will Really Want to Do This Summer

Children like many things, but for fun in the summer, it all comes down to 5 groups; amusement/water parks, animals, sports, learning and beautiful outdoor spaces. If you’re looking for some serious family fun this summer, start ticking them off your to-do list.

The best dance spots in Portland, Maine to get you in the mood

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Babies exposed to COVID in the womb show neur https://youbecamemamay.com/babies-exposed-to-covid-in-the-womb-show-neur/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 00:25:01 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/babies-exposed-to-covid-in-the-womb-show-neur/ According to a preliminary analysis presented in the 30e European Congress of Psychiatry. Project leader Dr Rosa Ayesa Arriola said: “Not all babies born to COVID-infected mothers show neurodevelopmental differences, but our data show that their risk is increased compared to those who are not exposed to COVID in the womb. We need a larger […]]]>

According to a preliminary analysis presented in the 30e European Congress of Psychiatry.

Project leader Dr Rosa Ayesa Arriola said: “Not all babies born to COVID-infected mothers show neurodevelopmental differences, but our data show that their risk is increased compared to those who are not exposed to COVID in the womb. We need a larger study to confirm the exact extent of the difference”.

Researchers have found that babies born to infected mothers have more difficulty relaxing and adjusting their bodies when held, compared to babies born to uninfected mothers, especially when infection occurred late in life. pregnancy. Additionally, infants born to infected mothers tend to show greater difficulty controlling head and shoulder movements. These alterations suggest a possible effect of COVID-19 on motor function (movement control).

The results come from an initial evaluation of the Spanish COGESTCOV-19 project, which followed the course of pregnancy and baby development in mothers infected with COVID-19. The researchers present data on pregnancy and postnatal assessment at 6 weeks after birth, but the project will continue to see if there are longer-term effects. The group will monitor infant language and motor development between 18 and 42 months.

The initial assessment compared babies born to 21 COVID-positive pregnant women and their babies, with 21 healthy controls attending the Marqués de Valdecilla University Hospital in Santander, Spain. The mothers underwent a series of tests during and after pregnancy. These included hormone tests and other biochemical tests (measuring things like cortisol levels, immunological response, etc.), saliva tests, movement responses, and psychological questionnaires. All analyzes were adjusted for infant age, sex and other factors.

Postnatal tests included the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (NBAS), which measures the baby’s movements and behavior.

Researcher Ms Águeda Castro Quintas (University of Barcelona, ​​Network Center for Biomedical Research in Mental Health), said:

We found that some elements of the NBAS measure were altered in 6-week-old infants who had been exposed to the SARS-COV-2 virus. Indeed, they react slightly differently when held or cuddled.”.

We were particularly sensitive to the way we conducted these tests. Every mother and every baby has been closely examined by clinicians with expert training in the field and in testing.

We should note that these are preliminary results, but are part of a project following a larger sample of 100 mothers and their babies. They were also monitored during pregnancy and after birth. We also plan to compare these mothers and babies with data from another similar project (the epi-project) which examines the effect of stress and genetics on child neurodevelopment.”.

Agueda Castro Quintas continues:

This is an ongoing project and we are only at the beginning. We found that babies whose mothers had been exposed to COVID showed neurological effects at 6 weeks, but we don’t know if these effects will lead to longer term problems, longer term observation can help us understand this .

Co-researcher Nerea San Martín González, added:

“Of course, in babies so young, there are several things that we simply cannot measure, such as language skills or cognition. We also need to be aware that this is a relatively small sample, so we are repeating the work and we will follow it over a longer period We need a larger sample to determine the role of infection on neurodevelopmental alterations in offspring and the contribution of other environmental factors In the meantime, we must emphasize the importance of medical monitoring to facilitate a healthy pregnancy, discussing any issues with your doctor if necessary”.

Commenting, the project leader, Dr Rosa Ayesa Arriola, said:

“Now is a good time to establish international collaborations that would allow us to assess long-term neurodevelopment in children born during the COVID-19 pandemic. Research in this area is essential to understand and prevent possible neurological problems and mental health vulnerabilities in these children in the years to come.”

In an independent commentary, Dr Livio Provenzi (University of Pavia, Italy) said:

“There is a great need to study the direct and indirect effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the health and well-being of parents and infants. Pregnancy is a time of life that shapes much of our later development, and exposure to adversity during pregnancy can leave lasting biological imprints. These findings from Dr. Rosa Ayesa Arriola’s group strengthen evidence for epigenetic alterations in infants born to mothers exposed to pandemic-related stress during pregnancy. This shows that we need more large-scale international research to enable us to understand the developmental effects of this health emergency and to provide better care for parents and infants.”

Dr. Provenzi did not participate in this work.

Note: The epi-project is a multicentric project involving the Hospital Clínic de Barcelona and the Central University Hospital of Asturias. It examines the effects of genetics and stress on baby outcomes. It is headed by Prof. Dr. Lourdes Fananas.

ENDS


Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of press releases posted on EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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Princess Beatrice just wore the most fabulous dress for the Jubilee concert at the Palace https://youbecamemamay.com/princess-beatrice-just-wore-the-most-fabulous-dress-for-the-jubilee-concert-at-the-palace/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 20:04:37 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/princess-beatrice-just-wore-the-most-fabulous-dress-for-the-jubilee-concert-at-the-palace/ Last modified 04 Jun 2022 21:20 BST Leanne Bayley Princess Beatrice attended the Jubilee concert at the palace, wearing a sensational dress from The Vampire’s Wife. The Queen’s granddaughter looked delighted to be surrounded by the other members of the Royal Family. Princess Beatrice looked super glamorous as she took a maternity night […]]]>





Leanne Bayley




Princess Beatrice looked super glamorous as she took a maternity night out to attend the Platinum Party at the Palace with the other royals. The Queen’s granddaughter looked stunning in a navy dress from The Vampire’s Wife as she enjoyed some of the country’s finest musicians performing on stage.

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Princess Beatrice looked sensational in the floaty navy dress as she waved animatedly to the crowd. Her chic ensemble was completed with a gold bracelet and a fascinator.

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WATCH: The Queen celebrates her platinum jubilee

The mother-of-one, married to Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi, is a regular at royal events, and we’re delighted to see the 33-year-old so happy.

Princess Beatrice looked perfect

While we adore Princess Beatrice’s ensemble, her hair really stole the show. The royal wore it long and loose, with delicately pinched tendrils adding a touch of volume – hair fit for a princess if we’ve ever seen it!

RELATED: Do You Love Princess Beatrice’s Floral Tea Dress? ASOS is selling a lookalike for £20

The Platinum Party at the Palace brought together the world’s greatest artists for an evening of musical tributes to celebrate Her Majesty’s Platinum Jubilee. Hosts Kirsty Young and Roman Kemp will lead Platinum Party coverage at The Palace, allowing viewers watching at home to get in on the action.

Queen + Adam Lambert kicked off the musical evening, followed by performances from Alicia Keys, Hans Zimmer, Ella Eyre, Craig David, Mabel, Elbow and George Ezra, who shared the three-stage setup with Duran Duran, Andrea Bocelli, Mimi Webb, Jax Jones, Celeste, Nile Rodgers, Sigala and Diversity.

READ: Princess Beatrice is the new royal hair goal – skip to Kate Middleton

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British Eurovision hero Sam Ryder also performed live, fresh off his success in Italy. Legend Diana Ross closed the two-and-a-half-hour show, with her first UK live performance in 15 years.

To the delight of royal fans, Princess Beatrice stepped out in a number of spectacular outfits for the Queen’s Jubilee this week, and one of our favorites is the Beulah’s buttoned blue dress that she wore to the Thanksgiving service. Pairing the outfit with a chic matching hat and a sophisticated blue clutch, the royal looked absolutely radiant as she made her way to St Paul’s Cathedral with husband Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi.

Do you like this story? Sign up for our special Queen’s Platinum Jubilee newsletter to get the latest news, photos and videos related to Her Majesty’s special milestone.

The HELLO! is editorial and independently chosen – we only feature articles that our editors like and approve of. HELLO! may receive a share of sales or other compensation from the links on this page. To find out more visit our FAQs.

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Artist Michelle Hartney invites the public to embroider messages from women asking for help with unwanted pregnancies https://youbecamemamay.com/artist-michelle-hartney-invites-the-public-to-embroider-messages-from-women-asking-for-help-with-unwanted-pregnancies/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 20:33:05 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/artist-michelle-hartney-invites-the-public-to-embroider-messages-from-women-asking-for-help-with-unwanted-pregnancies/ At a time when the United States Supreme Court is set to overturn Roe v. Wade and take a giant leap backwards when it comes to women’s reproductive rights, an artist invites audiences to reflect on women’s harrowing experiences before abortion was legalized. In 1928, Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, published Motherhood in […]]]>

At a time when the United States Supreme Court is set to overturn Roe v. Wade and take a giant leap backwards when it comes to women’s reproductive rights, an artist invites audiences to reflect on women’s harrowing experiences before abortion was legalized.

In 1928, Margaret Sanger, the founder of Planned Parenthood, published Motherhood in bondage, a collection of letters that women across the United States had written to him requesting information about contraception. They were helpless and scared, their lives an endless cycle of pregnancy and childbirth, miscarriages and infant mortality.

“These letters are so important because it’s easy to dismiss women’s stories,” Chicago artist michelle hartney told Artnet News.

In December, she began inviting the public to handwrite copies of these poignant letters for her play. Unplanned parenthooda project that is perhaps equal parts educational and therapeutic.

unplanned parenthood. Photo courtesy of Michelle Hartney. “width=”1011″ height=”1024″ srcset=”https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/Sula-1011×1024.jpg 1011w, https://news.artnet.com /app/news-upload/2022/05/Sula-296×300.jpg 296w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/Sula-1517×1536.jpg 1517w, https://news .artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/Sula-2023×2048.jpg 2023w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/Sula-50×50.jpg 50w, https ://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/Sula-1896×1920.jpg 1896w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/Sula-96×96. jpg 96w” sizes=”(max-width: 1011px) 100vw, 1011px”/>

Michelle Hartney, Unplanned parenthood. Photo courtesy of Michelle Hartney.

“A lot of the work that I do, it helps me vent my anger, my sadness and my rage at the different injustices that I see happening in the world,” Hartney said. “A lot of it was just to deal with my sadness and my anger.”

The handwritten letters will then be hand-embroidered onto pieces of dyed vintage wedding dresses with dandelion, a flower that was once picked for bouquets and is now considered a weed, symbolizing how drastically things can change. over a lifetime.

The stories these letters tell are hard to read. Many writers faced extreme poverty. They are often very aware of the risks to their physical and mental health, and that of their children, who often die very young.

A 43-year-old woman with 19 children wrote that she “would rather die than give birth to another child”. Another, who was just 14 when she got married, was pregnant for the 17th time. “I’m only 39 and everything is worn out,” she wrote.

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<p id=Michelle Hartney, Unplanned parenthood. Photo courtesy of Michelle Hartney.

“There were women who described trying to stay away from their husbands, and their husbands getting mad at them for refusing sex,” Hartney said. “The ones that really broke my heart are the women who describe ‘being on edge.’ It was postpartum depression, but they didn’t have the words for it, and they didn’t know what they were were crossing.

When the letters were written, Comstock laws prohibited the sale, distribution or possession of “obscene” publications, which contained information about contraception. This meant Sanger’s 1914 pamphlet, Family restriction, was illegal. Yet more than 250,000 women have heard of her expertise and have written letters asking for help.

“That’s one of the ways people found out Sanger had information about birth control, which sparked the letters,” Hartney said.

Michelle Hartney, Unplanned Parenthood.  Photo courtesy of Michelle Hartney.

Michelle Hartney, Unplanned parenthood. Photo courtesy of Michelle Hartney.

Hartney plans to present the work as an installation that will also challenge Sanger’s promotion of eugenics, a form of scientific racism studying arranged reproduction. She hopes the final work will educate viewers both about Sanger’s racism and the ongoing struggle for women’s reproductive freedom in the United States.

Hartney will create porcelain armatures on which to hang each embroidered letter, in part a reference to the role of fine china as a traditional wedding gift. Each will be hand painted with dyes made from flowers that have historically been used to induce miscarriage.

To carry out this time-consuming project, Hartney is looking for volunteers to embroider the letters. She will send them kits with fabric and yarn.

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<p id=Michelle Hartney, Unplanned parenthood. Photo courtesy of Michelle Hartney.

“I was just going to make 20 letters and sew them myself, but I realized it would be a much better project if it was collaborative — and it takes forever to sew every word,” Hartney said.

“As long as it’s readable, then I’m happy,” she added. “And if you don’t have the time or the energy to finish it, send it back and someone else will come get it.”

Hartney is already soliciting volunteers on the project’s website and will be hosting in-person sewing and writing events at 21 C. Museum Hotelswhich have locations in 11 cities across the South and Midwest.

Michelle Hartney, <em>unplanned parenthood</em>.  Photo courtesy of Michelle Hartney.  “width=”858″ height=”1024″ srcset=”https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/UnplannedParenthood_Segment-858×1024.jpg 858w, https://news.artnet.com /app/news-upload/2022/05/UnplannedParenthood_Segment-251×300.jpg 251w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/UnplannedParenthood_Segment-1287×1536.jpg 1287w, https://news .artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/UnplannedParenthood_Segment-1716×2048.jpg 1716w, https://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/UnplannedParenthood_Segment-42×50.jpg 42w, https ://news.artnet.com/app/news-upload/2022/05/UnplannedParenthood_Segment-1609×1920.jpg 1609w” sizes=”(max-width: 858px) 100vw, 858px”/></p>
<p id=Michelle Hartney, Unplanned parenthood. Photo courtesy of Michelle Hartney.

“It’s almost like they’re strategically placed in states that are going to lose access to abortion, so we’re not just preaching to the choir,” Hartney said.

Unfortunately, she sees Unplanned parenthood as a harbinger of things to come. Twenty-six states have “trigger” laws in place to ban abortion by the time the Supreme Court strikes down Roe and those nearly century-old letters will soon have 21st-century equivalents.

“We need to collect the stories that are already coming out of places like Texas where there’s basically an abortion ban,” Hartney said. “It’s really important to collect the stories now.”

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A new project studies better ways to take care of the psychological well-being of mothers https://youbecamemamay.com/a-new-project-studies-better-ways-to-take-care-of-the-psychological-well-being-of-mothers/ Tue, 31 May 2022 01:05:00 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/a-new-project-studies-better-ways-to-take-care-of-the-psychological-well-being-of-mothers/ New mums can access free online self-care resources to help them cope with the challenges of motherhood, part of an ongoing research trial by the University of Queensland. The program investigates better ways to care for the psychological well-being of mothers, particularly by helping mothers cope with difficult thoughts and feelings about their childbirth and […]]]>

New mums can access free online self-care resources to help them cope with the challenges of motherhood, part of an ongoing research trial by the University of Queensland.

The program investigates better ways to care for the psychological well-being of mothers, particularly by helping mothers cope with difficult thoughts and feelings about their childbirth and early feeding experiences.

UQ Researcher at the Faculty of Medicine and clinical psychologist Dr. Koa Whittingham is coordinating the next stage of the project with Laynee Brophy, a master’s student in clinical psychology.

“Motherhood can be a difficult and intense time as new moms learn to adapt and cope, and these online resources, accessible at home, tackle many of the issues they face,” said Dr Whittingham.

“The team is keen to build on our previous research on self-compassion, and we are now looking to test new resources that focus on self-care through living meaningfully.

“It means getting a clear idea of ​​what really matters to you personally and finding ways to translate that into action.

“Meaningful living can include the big things like basic parenting choices, as well as the little everyday details like remembering to put on your favorite music or go for a walk in the park.

“For the research to be representative, we would like to hear from all mothers, whether they are struggling or not.”

All participants will complete two online surveys, eight weeks apart, allowing researchers to determine exactly what effect the resources are having on mothers’ well-being.

Participants will receive text message reminders to help them make the most of the resources which can be accessed multiple times throughout the study and six months after its conclusion.

This study builds on a previous An Australia-wide research trial that showed simple online resources promoting self-compassion make a positive difference for mothers of babies.

Dr. Amy Mitchell of UQ School of Psychology and Griffith University School of Nursing and Midwifery said mothers in previous trials reported fewer depressive and traumatic symptoms in the two years following the birth of their babies.

Importantly, mothers also found it easier to accept compassion from people around them, as well as to show compassion for themselves in small ways.


We know moms tend to put themselves last and feel like they have to struggle on their own and that just doesn’t work.”


Dr. Amy Mitchell of UQ School of Psychology and Griffith University School of Nursing and Midwifery

After registering and completing an online survey, participants will have a 50% chance of being randomly selected to receive immediate access to online resources.

Other participants will have access to the resources after eight weeks.

Entrants must be over 18, live in Australia or New Zealand and have given birth within the last two years.

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Tribute to a Legend: Happy Birthday to the late Dr. Betty Shabazz! https://youbecamemamay.com/tribute-to-a-legend-happy-birthday-to-the-late-dr-betty-shabazz/ Sat, 28 May 2022 18:45:56 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/tribute-to-a-legend-happy-birthday-to-the-late-dr-betty-shabazz/ Dr. Betty ShabazzSource: Cheryl Chenet/Getty UPDATED 2:45 PM ET, May 28, 2022 Originally Posted – May 28, 2013 VSassuming responsibility for motherhood and widowhood, Dr. Betty Shabazz channeled his struggle and frustration into motivation and passion. While some see her as the widow of Malcolm X (El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz), Shabazz its own marked paths. Juggling […]]]>

Dr. Betty ShabazzSource: Cheryl Chenet/Getty

UPDATED 2:45 PM ET, May 28, 2022

Originally Posted – May 28, 2013

VSassuming responsibility for motherhood and widowhood, Dr. Betty Shabazz channeled his struggle and frustration into motivation and passion. While some see her as the widow of Malcolm X (El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz), Shabazz its own marked paths.

Juggling her life as a single mother of six and her commitment to education, Shabazz remains a powerful role model for anyone struggling to overcome tragedy. NewsOne honors Dr. Shabazz on May 28 and celebrates his life on what would have been his 88th birthday.

While some records suggest that Shabazz was born in Pinehurst, Georgia, she claimed Detroit as her home. According to her biography, recorded by the National Park Service, Shabazz was born Betty Dean Sanders in 1934 to young parents Ollie Mae Sander and Shellman Sandlin. Allegedly abused by her mother, Shabazz was then raised in Detroit by Lorenzo and Helen Malloy from the age of 11.

An influential African-American couple, the Malloys were active in their community. But they have largely kept discussions of racism away from their young charge. According his daughter IlyasahShabazz grew up in the African Methodist Episcopal Church and participated in Delta Sigma Theta Sprites in high school.

Pursuing her dream of becoming a teacher, Shabazz left Detroit and attended the Tuskegee Institute (now University) in Alabama. There she encountered racism which interfered with her studies. She changed her major to nursing and was encouraged by school staff to go to Brooklyn State College School of Nursing in New York. In New York, she experienced another form of racism.

She was soon introduced to the Nation of Islam after an invitation to dinner at a temple in Harlem. After a second visit, she will later hear and meet her future husband, Malcolm X. Yourken by his presence on the podium, Shabazz will attend several of his conferences. It is said that she and Malcolm talked often afterwards. After many encouragements from the minister, Shabazz converted to Islam in 1956.

Their courtship began soon after, often flanked by dozens of other people who served as chaperones, as was the custom. Although they never discussed wedding plans, Malcolm X would eventually make a phone call and ask for a union. They were married on January 14, 1958 in Lansing, Michigan.

Over the next seven years, the couple saw their family grow with the birth of four daughters Attallah, Quibila, Ilyasahand Gamillah. When her husband was murdered, Shabazz was pregnant with twins, malikah and Malak.

Lily: Honoring a Legend: Coretta Scott King’s Legacy as Leader and Organizer

After her husband’s death, Shabazz found herself in dire straits. However, by Alex Haley “The Autobiography of Malcolm X” had strong sales and he donated his share of the royalties to the Shabazz family. Actress Ruby Dee and Juanita Poitier (then wife of Sidney Poitier) came together to raise money to buy the Shabazz family a house in Mount Vernon, NY

After making a pilgrimage to Mecca and seeking ways to earn a living while raising six daughters, Shabazz enrolled in Jersey City Stage College (now New Jersey City University) in 1969. She graduated in education in one year and then entered a master’s program. . In 1972, she attended the University of Massachusetts at Amherst to earn a doctorate in higher education administration and program development.

While continuing her education, Shabazz made sure her daughters had as many opportunities as possible. On her website, Ilyasah shared that she and her sisters participated in summer camps with Quaker and Native American values, music lessons, and tutorials on Islam and the African Diaspora.

But Shabazz didn’t fade into the background after Malcolm’s passing. It has remained linked to the political organization in its own way. An iconic photo captured by Shabazz alongside the Democratic representative for president. Shirley ChisholmDorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, and Marion Anderson.

(left to right) Mrs. Betty Shabazz (widow of Malcom X);  Dorothee H.

Dr. Betty Shabazz greets Rep. Shirley Chisholm, Marion Anderson and Dorothy Height Source: New York Daily News Archive/Getty

She shuttled between Mount Vernon and the university for three years, defending and later earning her doctorate in 1975. The following year, she would become an associate professor of health sciences with a concentration in nursing at Medgar Evers College . In 1980, she headed the health sciences department but was promoted by the school’s president and named director of institutional advancement. Excelling in her role, she was again promoted to Director of Advancement and Public Affairs in 1984.

Like her contemporaries, Coretta Scott King and Myrlie Evers, Shabazz was more than an extension of her late husband’s legacy. Author Rusell Rickford noted this in a 2004 book on her approach to capturing the essence of her life in the book “Betty Shabazz”.

“I discovered while researching Dr. Shabazz that it was a mistake to approach his life solely in terms of Malcolm,” Rickford explained. “Pretty early in the research, I realized it wasn’t going to work that it was a compelling and valuable story in its own right. That she was a fascinating figure in her own right. And that her story needed to be respected.

He found that his life after Malcolm from 1965 to his death in 1997 reflected “victories, defeats and crises in the black community” and with black leadership. A mistake made by some mainstream sites when chronicling her life and work is that she did not challenge white supremacy like Malcolm.

But his work to support black communities and raise awareness of the “black condition” has done just that. Shabazz had a clear understanding of the struggle that awaited black people to seek freedom.

“No one will give us freedom,” she said in an earlier speech. “If someone were to give us freedom, we would have had it a long time ago. No one gave freedom to anyone else.

She said it was essential to fight for the potential of freedom. Shabazz also recognized that people deserve to have their needs met, regardless of their vocation or position in life.

“Not everyone is going to be a doctor or a lawyer,” she said. “The Universal Declaration of Human Rights affirms that every human being has the right to education. Every human being has the right to a job that allows him and his family to survive. And everyone has the right to decent and decent housing. Why is the worst food, the worst neighborhoods, the worst schools [and] worst jobs are relegated to blacks? This is not fair treatment. Black people have the right to resist oppression.

She also said that white people who make up the power structure and black people who are conditioned to accept the status quo see black people who challenge the system as “troublemakers”. She said if the tables were turned, those who despise people who campaign for change would do the same to get what they deserved.

Next month will mark 25 years since her tragic death after being caught in a fire believed to have been started by her then 12-year-old grandson. After more than 2,000 people attended a funeral, Dr Shabazz was laid to rest next to her husband in Hartsdale, NY

Though faced with odds that would break even the strongest person, Shabazz found a way to push forward and reach great heights. She shone where many others have failed. An honored ancestor, the late Dr. Betty Shabazz serves as a hopeful reminder that even tragedy cannot outweigh true determination.

Happy Birthday and Rest in Powerful Peace, Dr. Betty Shabazz!

SEE ALSO:

OP-ED: Black mothers have a lot at stake in this election, especially autonomy and freedom

America was founded on white supremacist violence. Dismantling it requires a change in our approach to racism and hate

Malcolm X speaking at a rally

11 pictures

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From healing scars to postpartum hair loss: beauty brands are using Instagram to talk honestly about the fourth trimester https://youbecamemamay.com/from-healing-scars-to-postpartum-hair-loss-beauty-brands-are-using-instagram-to-talk-honestly-about-the-fourth-trimester/ Mon, 23 May 2022 12:14:06 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/from-healing-scars-to-postpartum-hair-loss-beauty-brands-are-using-instagram-to-talk-honestly-about-the-fourth-trimester/ “Given the number of taboos surrounding women’s bodies and health, we are driven by our overriding mission to normalize conversations and break down censorship. Our community is always quick to share their thoughts with us, which is essential to share authentic content,” says Elvie CMO, Aoife Nally. “Ultimately, brave, unfiltered, and honest posts get positive […]]]>

“Given the number of taboos surrounding women’s bodies and health, we are driven by our overriding mission to normalize conversations and break down censorship. Our community is always quick to share their thoughts with us, which is essential to share authentic content,” says Elvie CMO, Aoife Nally. “Ultimately, brave, unfiltered, and honest posts get positive responses on our organic social media channels. But rather than likes and followers, we measure success by sparking honest conversations.

There is also Tommee Tippeewhose The Boob Life ad – a shameless celebration of women, their bodies and their infant feeding choices – launched last year. From leaky nipples to nighttime pumping sessions, her uncensored look at what women and their bodies go through, no matter how they feed, has been liked and shared hundreds of thousands of times. This is despite its ban on Facebook for nudity – another obstacle preventing women from seeing a realistic depiction of the postpartum period online.

One thing that can make it harder to take care of yourself physically after birth is the sudden change in priorities. In the meantime, you’re encouraged to indulge in prenatal yoga classes, massages, and pregnancy skincare ranges, but after the baby arrives, you may feel like self-care isn’t a thing. than another job on the list. On top of that, beauty and wellness products for new mothers are often quite unluxurious – veering towards the medicalized or the condescending (prepare to be treated like “mom” in all the marketing from there). ).

Fiona Toomey launched a postpartum care brand Nessa Organics in 2019, after struggling to find beauty products she loved after having babies of her own. “I felt pretty let down by the beauty industry when I had my kids — none of the products made me feel good about myself,” she says. “When we launched there was really nothing there, but there’s an element of self-care that’s really important after having a baby.”

Nessa’s products are tastefully packaged in pink and clay-colored bottles, smell great, and include everything from a balm for C-section scars to a scalp oil meant to alleviate postpartum hair loss. Stretch marks, loose skin and swollen breasts are all present on the @nessaorganics Instagram account, as well as regular series on topics such as vulvar health, birth recovery and breastfeeding, often in partnership with experts like Bourne.

Elvie Single Electric Breast Pump

Pai Skincare The Gemini Dual System Stretch Marks

“We started small, so Instagram was the only place we could show our personality. The educational aspect of postnatal care was huge for us and still is – it’s about helping women see that we’re going through all this ordeal,” Toomey explains. “We do a lot of polls and questions on Instagram, and get thousands of responses. People really want to let you know how they felt at this point.

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Marielle Heller, Paul Greengrass, Audrey Diwan, Michel Gondry and more are preparing the next films https://youbecamemamay.com/marielle-heller-paul-greengrass-audrey-diwan-michel-gondry-and-more-are-preparing-the-next-films/ Fri, 20 May 2022 20:59:01 +0000 https://youbecamemamay.com/marielle-heller-paul-greengrass-audrey-diwan-michel-gondry-and-more-are-preparing-the-next-films/ The Cannes market ensures there’s no shortage of updates, so we’ve got another roundup. The talented Marielle Heller has found her next project as Variety reports that she is set to direct Amy Adams in Night slut. The adaptation of Rachel Yoder’s novel is backed by Searchlight Pictures, which will release the film on Hulu. […]]]>

The Cannes market ensures there’s no shortage of updates, so we’ve got another roundup. The talented Marielle Heller has found her next project as Variety reports that she is set to direct Amy Adams in Night slut. The adaptation of Rachel Yoder’s novel is backed by Searchlight Pictures, which will release the film on Hulu. While production is slated to kick off this fall, Adams will direct as a woman “engrossed in the stay-at-home routine of raising a toddler in the suburbs, who slowly embraces the deep-rooted wild power of motherhood, as she becomes increasingly aware of the bizarre and unmistakable signs that she might become a dog.

Following world newsPaul Greengrass has announced his next project. The hoodfeatured by Benedict Cumberbatch, is a period piece depicting the Peasants’ Revolt of 1381. THR notes that our starring role will likely play a farmer leading the ‘Major Uprising’, which ‘took part in large parts of England in response to issues such as socio-economic and political tensions and high taxation’ .

Lukas Moodysson looks back on his 2000 hit Whole for his next film. Daily screen reports that the Swedish director will helm a sequel titled Set 99. The story will pick up in 1999 when the collective featured in the original is now made up of two people, Göran (Gustaf Hammarsten) and Klasse (Shanti Roney), as they reconnect with their old friends. Production begins in August, so expect a festival next year.

As the pinnacle of Michel Gondry’s career has arrived, we’re still looking forward to what he’ll be working on next and now we have an update on his first project in seven years. The reading list reports that he is preparing the comedy in French The solution book, starring Pierre Niney, Blanche Gardin, Camille Rutherford, Frankie Wallach and Vincent Elbaz. Although not much is yet known, it will follow “a filmmaker trying to overcome his creative demons”, perhaps an autobiographical plea given the director’s hiatus between projects.

Earlier this week, we reported that Bong Joon-ho’s upcoming film, an adaptation of Edward Ashton’s new sci-fi novel Mickey7 starring Robert Pattinson, would debut in August in the UK and now more actors have been added. Deadline reports that Toni Collette, Mark Ruffalo and Naomi Ackie arrive aboard the sci-fi film, which follows a disposable worker drone sent on an expedition with humans to colonize the ice world Niflheim. If a mission is too dangerous, Mickey is dispatched and if he dies, a new body can be regenerated with his memories intact.

Variety reports a remake of the 1982 Wim Wenders documentary Room 666 is currently filming at the Cannes Film Festival. Supported by MK2 Films, Lubna Playoust is directing the new project, entitled Curiosity Room, which will feature interviews with Audrey Diwan, Pietro Marcello, Joachim Trier, as well as expected appearances from David Cronenberg and Claire Denis, and many more. The original, which starred Jean-Luc Godard, Steven Spielberg, Michelangelo Antonioni, Rainer Werner Fassbinder and more, posed questions about the future of cinema. Considering the past few years, it’s definitely time for another temperature check. See an excerpt from the original below.

Related to the update above, Diwan and Wenders have found their upcoming movies. the Event director will make her English debut with Léa Seydoux for Emmanuelle, Variety reports. Another adaptation of Emmanuelle Arsan’s novel, Diwan and Rebecca Zlotowski wrote the screenplay that follows “a woman and the series of erotic fantasies she harbors”.

Meanwhile, Wenders will return to Tokyo to make a toilet film, THR reports. Starring Koji Yakusho, it will follow the actual city plan to create 17 public restrooms designed by renowned architects. “A toilet is a place where everyone is the same, there are no rich and poor, no old and young, everyone is part of humanity,” Wenders said. “There is something very Japanese about the idea, about the whole decor. And I almost think that’s a utopian idea.

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